A philosophy webcomic about the inevitable anguish of living a brief life in an absurd world. Also Jokes

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French Radical Eye for the Conservative Guy

Robespierre: "Welcome to French Radical Eye for the Conservative Guy, we are here with Conservative Edmond Burke, whose home needs a serious revolution."
Diderot: "Okay, we can get rid of all of this, it's so ugly."

Robespierre: "This chair is the worst thing I've ever seen, we can dump this for sure."
Burke: "Whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa! Not so fast. That chair has been in my family for 300 years, you can't just throw it out."
Robespierre: "Why not? It is horrible."

Robespierre: "Burke, you can't cling to every relic of the past just because that's how your ancestors did things."
Burke: "My ancestors always clung to the past, and damned if i won't do the same!"

Burke: "You don't know why they choose that chair. You don't know why their sons and daughters kept it. In short, you have no idea of the reasons behind why it is here."

Burke: "Are you really so arrogant, so certain of your so called “rationality” that you believe you can so quickly overturn traditions that you don’t even understand? That you can just throw out everything and start from scratch?"

Robespierre: "Yes. Obviously. It is ugly."
Diderot: "Super ugly."


Diderot
Robespierre

Burke

Robespierre: "Don't you see, Burke, the world belongs to the people, it is ours for the taking! If only we are bold enough, if we dream big enough, then we don't have to sit in ugly chairs every day just because they belong to our grandfather!"

Robespierre: "Allow yourself to dream! The house is yours, you can create the world that you want! You can remake everything and build a Utopian house now!"
Burke: "Well...i have always hated that chair..."

caption: "three hours later...."
description: Burke, Robespierre, and Diderot are all in a guillotine, as a magistrate read their sentence.

Magistrate: "For crimes against fashion, beauty, taste, sensibility, and betraying the revolution, i hereby sentence you all to death, by order of the Revolutionary Tribunal."

Burke: "God damnit! I knew it! You can't just reinvent everything from scratch, i told you guys."
Diderot: "This is all your fault, Robespierre! You unleashed forces that you could not control."

Robespierre: "How was i supposed to know he had even worse taste than his grandparents?
Diderot: "You saw what he was wearing!"

Magistrate: "Any last words, Robespierre?"
Robespierre: "Yes...that chair was ugly, and i will gladly die by the principles i lived by."

Magistrate: "Edmund Burke, last words?"
Burke: "Yes, the enlightenment was a stupid idea, and we never should have done it. Also i don't care for the French."
Magistrate: "Fair enough."
"I knew those throw pillows were too ostentatious."

Edmond Burke is in some ways the founder of modern conservatism, and is most famous for staunchly opposing the French Revolution. Burke believe that people ultimately understood very little about the forces that governed society, and any changes that we make have to be done slowly to ensure that society doesn't collapse into anarchy. He thought the radicals that wanted to remake society "rationally" during the French Revolution were far too arrogant in their ability to imagine a utopian society from scratch, and any attempt to do so would only result in disaster. While he believed in social progress, he thought we should never make large changes all at once, or we would risk dissolving institutions that we did not fully understand and upsetting the balance in society, bringing large scale suffering.

He wrote Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790, only eighteen months after the revolution had begun, so a lot of his predictions of unrestrained violence came true. Of course, his ideas such as "actually, democracy is bad", and "women shouldn't be educated" aged a little less well.

Edmond Burke is in some ways the founder of modern conservatism, and is most famous for staunchly opposing the French Revolution. Burke believe that people ultimately understood very little about the forces that governed society, and any changes that we make have to be done slowly to ensure that society doesn't collapse into anarchy. He thought the radicals that wanted to remake society "rationally" during the French Revolution were far too arrogant in their ability to imagine a utopian society from scratch, and any attempt to do so would only result in disaster. While he believed in social progress, he thought we should never make large changes all at once, or we would risk dissolving institutions that we did not fully understand and upsetting the balance in society, bringing large scale suffering.

He wrote Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790, only eighteen months after the revolution had begun, so a lot of his predictions of unrestrained violence came true. Of course, his ideas such as "actually, democracy is bad", and "women shouldn't be educated" aged a little less well.

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